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Hand Cuff Use

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Admin
Admin

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Hand Cuff Use

Post by Admin on Sat Jan 10, 2015 4:31 pm

Does anyone know the policy on guards wearing handcuffs on their duty belt? I understand you need training a certification to wear a baton and cuffs if the employer allows(and its added to their agency license) it but what about just cuffs? Is there a course out there that teaches just self-defence and cuff use?


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DavidJ

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Re: Hand Cuff Use

Post by DavidJ on Sun Jan 11, 2015 4:29 pm

In Ontario security guards can only carry handcuffs or batons if a) they are trained (certified) for that use of force tool and b) that use of force tool is issued by their employer.

I would assume each province would have this covered in the Act or Act's regulations that governs security guards.

In Ontario carrying cuffs/baton that are not issued by you employer is a violation of the PSISA.

Ontario:
http://www.e-laws.gov.on.ca/Browse?queryText=&resultCount=200&sortField=dDocTitle&sortOrder=ASC&startIndex=1&type=statutes&letter=P&lang=en&reload=yes#result  when you hit the "+" tab to the left of the act the Regulations to the Act will come up.

Private Security and Investigative Services Act, 2005
ONTARIO REGULATION 366/07
EQUIPMENT
Consolidation Period: From July 30, 2009 to the e-Laws currency date.
Last amendment: O. Reg. 283/09.
..............

Handcuffs
3.  An individual licensee may use handcuffs in the provision of private investigator or security guard services only if the handcuffs are issued to the individual licensee by the licensed or registered business entity that employs the individual licensee. O. Reg. 366/07, s. 3.

Restraints
4.  An individual licensee may not use cable ties or strip ties as restraints in the provision of private investigator or security guard services. O. Reg. 366/07, s. 4.
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DavidJ

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Re: Hand Cuff Use

Post by DavidJ on Sun Jan 11, 2015 4:50 pm

I cannot stress enough as to how important it is for Canadian security guards not to over extend themselves. There is training that is a joke and there is proper training. Know your authority limits for C.C.C. and your respective provincial Acts (i.e. trespassing).

Policing is what it is and security is what it is. They are not one in the same. Sad that some security guards get duped into being aggressive to clear up a site. Then get badly assaulted or end up on assault charges themselves. For minimum wage? Seriously?!?!?!

Learn your company's policies on use of force. Don't forget to learn the policies of the client on various issues as well. Policies such as use of force, cuffs/batons, arrests (c.c.c. or provincial) are important to understand. If there is a policy prohibiting a certain action/tool then you will find yourself not covered in the case of a liability matter.

If you work for a company that is urging you to be aggressive, demand proper training in use of force and in understanding your actual lawful authority.
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StevenWS

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Re: Hand Cuff Use

Post by StevenWS on Sun Jan 11, 2015 8:51 pm

DavidJ wrote:I cannot stress enough as to how important it is for Canadian security guards not to over extend themselves. There is training that is a joke and there is proper training. Know your authority limits for C.C.C. and your respective provincial Acts (i.e. trespassing).

Policing is what it is and security is what it is. They are not one in the same. Sad that some security guards get duped into being aggressive to clear up a site. Then get badly assaulted or end up on assault charges themselves. For minimum wage? Seriously?!?!?!

Learn your company's policies on use of force. Don't forget to learn the policies of the client on various issues as well. Policies such as use of force, cuffs/batons, arrests (c.c.c. or provincial) are important to understand. If there is a policy prohibiting a certain action/tool then you will find yourself not covered in the case of a liability matter.

If you work for a company that is urging you to be aggressive, demand proper training in use of force and in understanding your actual lawful authority.


That is great information Dave. I am looking forward to the day when wages are good enough to recruit quality individuals to do security work. I think with proper training we will be able to do more then observe and report.


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DavidJ

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Re: Hand Cuff Use

Post by DavidJ on Sat Jan 17, 2015 4:00 pm

Lets face it, security, whether in-house or contract, and with exception to a very small group of special units (i.e. Ontario Power Generation and some health care entities) is a necessary evil in the eyes of those paying the tab. The want to spend as little on this service as they can. It has pretty much always been that way.

The contract security industry is dog eat dog in nature. If company "A" ups its price to pay its guards better then the customer will shop around for another security provider. And there are lots of company "B's" out there. 

The only real way to make the security industry better is with improved legislation which would need to include wage scales along with upscale training and oversight.  But that is not likely to happen anytime soon.

Ontario is extremely lame when it comes fixing such issues. All one has to do is look at special constables employed by non police entities here in Ontario to see the lack of commitment on the part of the Government. Ontario special constables are allowed to be created under section 53 of the police services act. Once created, they become the burden of their sponsor police agency to oversee as there is no legislation to govern training, uniform look or accountability. At the same time the Government has pretty much stifled the police services who have complained. The Government likes this second tier of quasi police that they don't have to pay for or take responsibility for.

There are 9 Ontario universities, 1 college, 4 transit systems and 1 community housing system using special constables. Each one operated under a sponsor agreement with a police agency. That is there oversight.

Ontario universities back in 1995 got the ball rolling with improvement in training and look. Virtually nothing more than a gentleman's agreement, they brought training standards up to an acceptable level. Today most demand the ATS for new hires along with a suitable college/university education.

University, transit and housing special constables (Ontario) are paid very well $30+/hour and benefits. But these entities are publicly funded and that makes a big difference.

But even in the world of special constables you see them being pushed to take on more traditional policing duties. Off the top I can't think of any special constables that do not have vests, cuffs, batons and pepper spray. Their vehicles are police style vehicles with prisoner partitions and red, red/blue, blue emergency lights. Most deal with criminal matters from start to finish with only extremely serious matters being deferred to police.

I went on the ramble about special constables to give you an idea of where security guards sit in the grand scheme. No one is in any hurry to change anything.


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